Projects
Name
Examining Novel Resuscitation Techniques for Newborn Infants
University
University of Alberta
Domain
Pediatrics
Departement
Department of Pediatrics
Head
Dr. Susan Gilmour
Tutor
Dr. Georg Schmolzer
Languages
English
Duration
4 weeks
Availability
Cities/Months Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Augt Sep Oct Nov Dec
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Type of Research Project
- Clinical Project with Laboratory work
What is the background of the project?
Description: Globally, 15 million newborns are born prematurely and 20% of them require support at birth; annually, ~1 million of these will die due to birth asphyxia. A significant proportion of these critically ill newborns survive with chronic lung disease or neurodevelopmental disabilities. This puts a heavy burden on health resources, as these infants require frequent hospital re-admission. Refining resuscitation techniques to decrease long-term complications has potential to improve quality of life for newborns and their families. The project will examine one aspect of neonatal resuscitation at birth (e.g. different approaches to chest compression, use of inotropes in post-resuscitation, heart rate changes during delayed cord clamping, use of sustained inflation during respiratory support). Aim: To provide new information for the neonatal resuscitation guidelines 2020 to improve neonatal care (e.g. different approaches to chest compression, use of inotropes in post-resuscitation, heart rate changes during delayed cord clamping, use of sustained inflation during respiratory support). Techniques: a) Animal laboratory at the University of Alberta: The animal lab is using an established, swine model with high translational values. This model is used to study respiratory, cardiovascular and neurological changes, patho-physiology and pharmacology of neonatal hypoxia and reoxygenation injury. The lab is equipped with all the tools necessary for a complex surgical model including cardio-vascular and respiratory monitoring and recording. Specifically the laboratory has 2 fully functional operating theatres for animals equipped with ventilators, cardiac monitors, blood flow meters, multiple surgical instruments, infusion pumps, anesthesia and analgesic medications, and blood gas analyzer with co-oximetry measurement. Precise evaluation of our neonatal piglets can be performed throughout the surgery and postoperative period by an array of monitors and direct computer links. In the animal lab studies are performed to examine various aspects of neonatal resuscitation (e.g. different approaches to chest compression, use of inotropes in post-resuscitation) b) Delivery rooms at the Royal Alexandra Hospital: The RAH is one of the largest level III Neonatal Intensive Care Units in North America and one of the largest perinatal center for premature infants in Canada. Indeed, it has ~2000 high-risk deliveries every year. The Neonatal Resuscitation team is an internationally recognized leader in resuscitation research. In the DR, our uniquely equipped recording system continuously measures heart rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, respiratory function, cerebral tissue oxygenation, and cardiac output with functional echocardiography. In addition, resuscitations are video recorded for later analysis. In the delivery room studies are designed and performed to investigate different aspects of neonatal transition (e.g. heart rate changes during delayed cord clamping, use of sustained inflation during respiratory support).
What is the aim of the project?
To provide new information for the neonatal resuscitation guidelines 2020 to improve neonatal care (e.g. different approaches to chest compression, use of inotropes in post-resuscitation, heart rate changes during delayed cord clamping, use of sustained inflation during respiratory support).
What techniques and methods are used?
a) Animal laboratory at the University of Alberta: The animal lab is using an established, swine model with high translational values. This model is used to study respiratory, cardiovascular and neurological changes, patho-physiology and pharmacology of neonatal hypoxia and reoxygenation injury. The lab is equipped with all the tools necessary for a complex surgical model including cardio-vascular and respiratory monitoring and recording. Specifically the laboratory has 2 fully functional operating theatres for animals equipped with ventilators, cardiac monitors, blood flow meters, multiple surgical instruments, infusion pumps, anesthesia and analgesic medications, and blood gas analyzer with co-oximetry measurement. Precise evaluation of our neonatal piglets can be performed throughout the surgery and postoperative period by an array of monitors and direct computer links. In the animal lab studies are performed to examine various aspects of neonatal resuscitation (e.g. different approaches to chest compression, use of inotropes in post-resuscitation) b) Delivery rooms at the Royal Alexandra Hospital: The RAH is one of the largest level III Neonatal Intensive Care Units in North America and one of the largest perinatal center for premature infants in Canada. Indeed, it has ~2000 high-risk deliveries every year. The Neonatal Resuscitation team is an internationally recognized leader in resuscitation research. In the DR, our uniquely equipped recording system continuously measures heart rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, respiratory function, cerebral tissue oxygenation, and cardiac output with functional echocardiography. In addition, resuscitations are video recorded for later analysis. In the delivery room studies are designed and performed to investigate different aspects of neonatal transition (e.g. heart rate changes during delayed cord clamping, use of sustained inflation during respiratory support).
What is the role of the student?
What are the tasks expected to be accomplished by the student?
Students will use either animal or human data for analysis, trouble identification and hypothesis generation. Students will be involved in several steps of the project. Students will be perform a review of the literature to summarize the objectives, hypotheses and research questions. They will also learn how to operate all the equipment to participate in either basic lab or delivery room research to being able to obtain their own measurements. Students will be involved in data collection to get a deeper understanding of how research is performed. For data analysis students will use our physiological recording database for analysis. Our neonatal research team will support the students during data analysis to understand statistical analysis. Finally, students will prepare poster or podium presentations, and (first) author and submit a manuscript.
Will there be any theoretical teaching provided (preliminary readings, lectures, courses, seminars etc)
Yes
What is expected from the student at the end of the research exchange? What will be the general outcome of the student?
- The student will prepare a poster
- The student will prepare a presentation
- The student will prepare an abstract
What skills are required of the student? Is there any special knowledge or a certain level of studies needed?
Interest in neonatal research and dedication to do research. Willingness to work long hours (lab work days could be up to 10 hours depending on the project)
Are there any legal limitations in the student’s involvement
No
Hours
8
Type of students accepted
This project accepts:
- Medical students
- Graduated students (less than 6 months)
- Pre-Medical students from the American-British system
Articles
- www.research4babies.org