Projects
Name
Oxidative stress in host-pathogen interactions
University
Germany (bvmd) - Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum
Domain
Biochemistry
Departement
Institute of Biochemistry and Pathobiochemistry ? Microbial Biochemistry Ruhr University Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum
Head
Prof. Dr. Lars I. Leichert
Tutor
Dr. Alexandra Baumann and others, E-mail: microbiochem@ruhr-uni-bochum.de Phone: +49 234 3224585
Languages
English, German
Duration
4 weeks
Availability
Cities/Months Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Augt Sep Oct Nov Dec
No yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes No
Type of Research Project
- Basic science
What is the background of the project?
When bacteria encounter cells of the human immune system, they are exposed to a plethora of oxidative stressors. A working oxidative stress response is therefore vital for pathogens to evade the immune system. We are using a model system to study the role of oxidative stress in host-pathogen interactions, specifically when bacteria encounter our immune system. We try to understand how bacterial cells evolved to cope with oxidative stress. We suspect one of the underlying mechanisms to be so-called thiol-based redox signaling. We want to identify the specific thiol switch proteins that detect oxidative stress in bacteria as well as in the host cells. What techniques and methods will be used? Bacterial cell culture, mammalian cell culture, protein biochemistry, molecular biology, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein analytics. For the use of students considering participating in the project, further information can be found from the following articles (please add specific articles): Incidence and physiological relevance of protein thiol switches. Please read the following articles: Leichert and Dick 2015 Biol Chem. 396(5):389-99 Activation of RidA chaperone function by N-chlorination. (2014) Mueller et al., Nat Commun. 5:5804 Redox proteomics uncovers peroxynitrite-sensitive proteins that help Escherichia coli to overcome nitrosative stress. (2013) Lindemann et al., J Biol Chem 288(27):19698-714
What is the aim of the project?
We try to understand how bacterial cells evolved to cope with oxidative stress. We suspect one of the underlying mechanisms to be so-called thiol-based redox signaling. We want to identify the specific thiol switch proteins that detect oxidative stress in bacteria as well as in the host cells.
What techniques and methods are used?
Bacterial cell culture, mammalian cell culture, protein biochemistry, molecular biology, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein analytics.
What is the role of the student?
What are the tasks expected to be accomplished by the student?
A general understanding of basic research work and specific skills in microbiology such as sterile work, transfortmation, transduction, westernblot, protein purification. Further he/she will aquire knowledge about protein biochemistry and/or molecular biology
Will there be any theoretical teaching provided (preliminary readings, lectures, courses, seminars etc)
1
What is expected from the student at the end of the research exchange? What will be the general outcome of the student?
What skills are required of the student? Is there any special knowledge or a certain level of studies needed?
Some laboratory experience in molecular biology, biochemistry or microbiology (e.g. practical courses that are part of the medical curriculum) would be adviseable. There no other legal limitations. The student has to fill out his/her logbook. There will be a weekly lab seminar. During the semester, there is also a department seminar.
Are there any legal limitations in the student’s involvement
No
Hours
8
Type of students accepted
This project accepts:
- Medical students
- Pre-Medical students from the American-British system
Articles