Iraq
NMO GENERAL INFORMATION
Iraq IFMSA-Iraq
LANGUAGE
REQUIRED LANGUAGE
Arabic
English
(GMT+03:00) Kuwait, Riyadh, Baghdad
Iraqi dinar
SCOPE Active
SCORE Active
Iraq (IFMSA-Iraq) - Baghdad

0 SCOPE STUDENTS
0 SCORE STUDENTS
SCOPE EXCHANGE CONDITIONS
SCORE EXCHANGE CONDITIONS
www.ifmsa-iraq.org
NEOs
Ahmed Albyati
NOREs
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ABBAS ABBAS
WELCOME NOTE
Welcome to IRAQ - BAGHDAD and enjoy our first exchange program. Welcome to Babylon, Assyrian civilazations. Welcome to the most wonderful civilazations of the world.
OVERVIEW
Baghdad  is the capital of the Republic of
Iraq, as well as the coterminous Baghdad Province. The population of Baghdad, as of 2011, is approximately
7,216,040, making it the largest city in Iraq, the second largest city in the Arab world (after Cairo, Egypt), and the
second largest city in Western Asia (after Tehran, Iran). According to the government, which is preparing for a
census, the population of the country has reached 35 million, with 9 million in the capital.
Located along the Tigris River, the city was founded in the 8th century and became the capital of the Abbasid
Caliphate. Within a short time of its inception, Baghdad evolved into a significant cultural, commercial, and
intellectual center for the Islamic world. This, in addition to housing several key academic institutions (e.g. House of
Wisdom), garnered the city a worldwide reputation as the "Center of Learning". Throughout the High Middle Ages,
Baghdad was considered to be the largest city in the world with an estimated population of 1,200,000 people.
According to some archeologists it was the first city to reach a population over one million inhabitants.
HEALTH CARE SYSTEM
Iraq had developed a centralized free health care system in the 1970s using a hospital based, capital-intensive
model of curative care. The country depended on large-scale imports of medicines, medical equipment and even
nurses, paid for with oil export income, according to a “Watching Brief” report issued jointly by the United Nations
Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) in July 2003. Unlike other poorer countries,
which focused on mass health care using primary care practitioners, Iraq developed a Westernized system of
sophisticated hospitals with advanced medical procedures, provided by specialist physicians. The UNICEF/WHO
report noted that prior to 1990, 97 percent of the urban dwellers and 71 percent of the rural population had access
to free primary health care; just 2 percent of hospital beds were privately managed.


MEDICAL EDUCATION
Medical education in Iraq is based on the 6-year British curriculum and is carried out in English. Medical education
is free, and all required textbooks are provided free to students. Postgraduate residency training is required for
both Iraqi and Arab board certification in each specialty.
There are 20 colleges of medicine in Iraq, seven colleges of nursing, 10 colleges of dentistry and 8 colleges of
pharmacy in addition to 6 technical colleges and 20 colleges of sciences which take the responsibility for
supporting health care services and delivery.
TRANSPORTATION
We depend on Taxis and Buses for local and national transportation. the taxi and buses are cheap and available.
SOCIAL PROGRAM
According to the local committee but im sure it will be unforgettable
MUST SEE
Baghdad-Babylon-Basrah
CULTURAL DIFFERENCES
Baghdad has always played a significant role in the broader Arab cultural sphere, contributing several significant
writers, musicians and visual artists. Famous Arab poets and singers such as Nizar Qabbani, Umm Kulthum, Fairuz,
Salah Al-Hamdani, Ilham al-Madfai and others have performed for the city.
The dialect of Arabic spoken in Baghdad today differs from that of other large urban centres in Iraq, having features
more characteristic of nomadic Arabic dialects (Verseegh, The Arabic Language). It is possible that this was caused
by the repopulating of the city with rural residents after the multiple sacks of the late Middle Ages.
Some of the important cultural institutions in the city include:
• Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra – Rehearsals and performances were briefly interrupted during the
Second Gulf War, but have since returned to normal.
• National Theater
Mutanabbi Street (Arabic:
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION