Bosnia and Herzegovina
NMO GENERAL INFORMATION
Bosnia and Herzegovina SaMSIC
LANGUAGE
REQUIRED LANGUAGE
Serbian, Bosnian, Croatian
English
(GMT+01:00) Belgrade, Bratislava, Budapest, Ljubljana, Prague
Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark
SCOPE Active
Bosnia and Herzegovina - Rep. of Srpska (SaMSIC) - Banjaluka

35 SCOPE STUDENTS
0 SCORE STUDENTS
SCOPE EXCHANGE CONDITIONS
SCORE EXCHANGE CONDITIONS
www.samsic.org
NEOs
Stefan Tesanovic
Obren Tomić
NOREs
NORE Samsic
WELCOME NOTE
Welcome! We hope You will find these informations useful.
OVERVIEW

Identification

In the name Republika Srpska, the first word means republic. The second word is a nominalized adjective derived by adding the suffix -ska to srb-, the root of the noun Srbin, meaning Serb. The -ps- sequence rather than -bs- is a result of voicing assimilation.

Demography

The population was 4,364,574 in 1991. A U.S. estimate of the population in July 2000 was 3,835,777; however, that figure is not reliable as a result of dislocations and deaths from military activity and ethnic cleansing. In 1991, approximately 44 percent of the people were Bosniac, 31 percent were Serb, 17 percent were Croat, 5.5 percent were Yugoslav (of mixed ethnicity), and 2.5 percent were of other ethnicities. Since that time, the Bosniac population has declined and that of the Serbs has risen because of ethnic cleansing by the Serbian army. (The terms "Bosniac" and "Muslim" often are used interchangeably; "Bosniac" refers more explicitly to an ethnicity, to avoid confusion with the term "Muslim," which refers to any follower of the Islamic faith.)

Since 1995, the country has been internally divided into a Bosniac/Croat Federation, which controls 51 percent of the land and whose majority is Bosniac and Croat, and a Serb Republic, which has the other 49 percent and has a Serb majority. Herzegovina, which borders Croatia, has historically had a Croat majority.

Linguistic Affiliation

Croatian, Serbian, and Bosnian are virtually identical; the distinction among them is a matter of identity politics. Serbians write their language in the Cyrillic alphabet, whereas Croatian and Bosnian use the Latin script. English is spoken among youth. Omniglot page has some useful phrases in Serbian language with pronunciation.

Religion

Religious Beliefs. Islam is associated with the Bosniacs, Eastern Orthodox with the Serbs, and Catholicism with the Croatians.

Icons, which are images representing Christ, angels, saints, and other holy figures, hold an important place in Orthodox practice and are considered a connection between the earthly and spiritual realms.

Religious Practitioners. The central religious figures in Islam are called muezzins, scholars of the Koran who call the faithful to prayer. The Koran is seen as the ultimate authority in the religion. In the Eastern Orthodox religion, priests are the primary religious authorities; they are permitted to marry. The Eastern Orthodox religion does not recognize the authority of the Pope but follows a group of patriarchs who have equal status.

Rituals and Holy Places. Mosques are Muslim houses of worship. It is customary to remove one's shoes before entering. The prayer hall has no pews or seats; instead, worshipers kneel on prayer rugs. After Ramadan, people exchange small gifts, visit friends, and have a large family meal.

Eastern Orthodox religious ceremonies are held in elaborate, beautifully designed churches, many of which date back hundreds of years. Each family has a patron saint who is honored once a year in a large celebration called Krsna Slava. A candle is lit in the saint's honor, and special foods are consumed. Christmas (observed 6 and 7 January in the Orthodox Church) is a major holiday. Christmas Eve, called Badnje Vece, is celebrated with a large bonfire in the churchyard and the singing of hymns. In addition to church services, Easter is celebrated by dying eggs and performing traditional kolo dances.

HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

The Clinical centre is the largest and the most important public health institution in the Republic of Srpska. The main activity of the Clinical centre Banja Luka is hospital treatment (admission, diagnostic and treatment) of the patients at the secondary and tertiary level of healthcare services.

The Clinical Centre, within its field of activity, provides hospital and non-hospital healthcare services at the secondary and tertiary level of the healthcare services. The Clinical Centre is the referral health institution at the Republic of Srpska level for the services that provide and scientific base for Medical School and Faculty of Medicine of the University of Banja Luka.

 

MEDICAL EDUCATION

STRUCTURE OF EDUCATION SYSTEM

The medical studies in Bosnia and Herzegovina last 6 years, 3 preclinical+ 3 clinical. 

TRANSPORTATION

To get to Banja Luka you can use one of the following transport matters:

1.Airport Mahovljani- situated a few kilometers away from the city  ,now it has qite good connections with other airports.
the site https://www.banjaluka-airport.com/

2.Airport Sarajevo - 250 km from Banja Luka ,but you can use Bus transport or train to get here.
https://www.sarajevo-airport.ba/

3.Bus station Banja Luka- can be of some use 

You can find this site useful: https://wikitravel.org/en/Banja_Luka


SOCIAL PROGRAM

Social program is compose from:

1)Working day activities

2)Weekend activities

As students arrive they have "Reception for Incomings and Social program presentation".

1.Working day activities
After your clerkship and hospital time there are some afternoon stuff that we organise, it include:
-First aid workshops with our faculty First Aid team;
-Movie night;
-Selfdefence class;
-Brasilian jiu jitsu class;
-Climbing night;
-Hiking;
-Hot springs;
-City History tour;
-Show and tell;
-Hills to springs;
-Gypsy market;
-Laser tag shooting;
-Etno village exploration;
-River party;
-Pool time;
-Rakia night;
-Milky night;
-Nektar beer factory exploration;
-BL explore treasure hunt game;
-Latino night;
-Paintball;
-Rafting and etc.

2.Weekend activities
During weekend we organise trips to cities close to Banja Luka, like Jajce, Zelenkovac, Bihać.
Also we organise trip to Sarajevo, Višegrad, Mostar, sometimes Zagreb or Belgrade.
*Special trip in August is Sarajevo-Višegrad-Guča(Guča is in Serbia-we organise trip during the most famous trumpet festival).

Also at the start of your stay in Banja Luka we give you CALENDAR with exact dates of activities, so you know when you have free time and when you can organise something you want to see.

NEO-s and CPs are always there to help you if you want to visit something by your own.

Bring your tent, sleeping bag, sneakers and enjoy your stay here! (even if you don't have it, we will find some for you.)

We wait for you in Banja Luka to make your summer amazing!

MUST SEE

Banja Luka has enormous tourism potential.

It was as early as the Middle Ages that Banja Luka was desribed as "a paradise valley", with its orchards, beautiful countryside and courtyards taken care of with taste.

 The natural resource of particular importance is the Vrbas River, Banja Luka`s main stream ...

You must see things like Fortress Kastel, Ferhad Pasa Mosk, Church of Christ the Saviour, GeoTermal waters, Ethno villages...
...then try Rafting, Dajak and some of our delicious traditional food.....

CULTURAL DIFFERENCES

Croatian, Serbian, and Bosnian are virtually identical; the distinction among them is a matter of identity politics. Serbians write their language in the Cyrillic alphabet, whereas Croatian and Bosnian use the Latin script. English is spoken among youth. Omniglot page has some useful phrases in Serbian language with pronunciation.

Religion

Religious Beliefs. Islam is associated with the Bosniacs, Eastern Orthodox with the Serbs, and Catholicism with the Croatians.

Icons, which are images representing Christ, angels, saints, and other holy figures, hold an important place in Orthodox practice and are considered a connection between the earthly and spiritual realms.

Religious Practitioners. The central religious figures in Islam are called muezzins, scholars of the Koran who call the faithful to prayer. The Koran is seen as the ultimate authority in the religion. In the Eastern Orthodox religion, priests are the primary religious authorities; they are permitted to marry. The Eastern Orthodox religion does not recognize the authority of the Pope but follows a group of patriarchs who have equal status.

Rituals and Holy Places. Mosques are Muslim houses of worship. It is customary to remove one's shoes before entering. The prayer hall has no pews or seats; instead, worshipers kneel on prayer rugs. After Ramadan, people exchange small gifts, visit friends, and have a large family meal.

Eastern Orthodox religious ceremonies are held in elaborate, beautifully designed churches, many of which date back hundreds of years. Each family has a patron saint who is honored once a year in a large celebration called Krsna Slava. A candle is lit in the saint's honor, and special foods are consumed. Christmas (observed 6 and 7 January in the Orthodox Church) is a major holiday. Christmas Eve, called Badnje Vece, is celebrated with a large bonfire in the churchyard and the singing of hymns. In addition to church services, Easter is celebrated by dying eggs and performing traditional kolo dances.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
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