Italy (SISM) - Ancona
LC GENERAL INFORMATION
100861
2983
Cardiology, Neurology, Surgery General, Gastroenterology, kidney and biliary tract transplants, Ophtalmology, Oncology, Plastic Surgery, Pneumology, Internal Medicine, Dermatology
October, march
2 SCOPE STUDENTS
0 SCORE STUDENTS
Pocket money
Student Hostel, Flat, Host Family
They are listed in the EC.
http://ancona.sism.org
LEOs
Elisa Cocci
OVERVIEW

Ancona was founded by Greek settlers from Syracuse about 387 BC, who gave it its name: Ancona stems from the Greek word Αγκων, meaning "elbow"; the harbour to the east of the town was originally protected only by the promontory on the north, shaped like an elbow. Greek merchants established a Tyrian purple dye factory here.[1] In Roman times it kept its own coinage with the punning device of the bent arm holding a palm branch, and the head of Aphrodite on the reverse, and continued the use of the Greek language.

When it became a Roman colony is uncertain. It was occupied as a naval station in the Illyrian War of 178 BC.[2] Julius Caesartook possession of it immediately after crossing the Rubicon. Its harbour was of considerable importance in imperial times, as the nearest to Dalmatia, and was enlarged by Trajan, who constructed the north quay with his Syrian architect Apollodorus of Damascus. At the beginning of it stands the marble triumphal arch with a single archway, and without bas-reliefs, erected in his honour in 115 by the Senate and Roman people.

UNIVERSITY AND HOSPITALS
The Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti Ancona (AOR) is a University hospital (3 major buildings) and part of the National Health Service working in cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Marche, and the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery.
RESEARCH PROJECTS AND LABS
This LC is not SCORE active.
BOARDING
The students will receive a pocket money that can be spent for their meals. The pocket money is meant to cover the cost of one single meal per day.
LODGING
The students will be accomodated in a student's hostel or a flat. Accomodation in host family may also be possible depending on availability.
TRANSPORTATION

Shipping

The Port has regular ferry links to the following cities with the following operators:

Airport

Ancona is served by Ancona Airport (IATA: AOI, ICAO: LIPY), in Falconara Marittima and named after Raffaello Sanzio.

European Coastal Airlines, a seaplane operator, established trans-Adriatic flights between Croatia and Italy in November 2015 and offers four weekly flights from Ancona Falconara Airport and Split (59 minutes) and Rijeka Airport (49 minutes).

Railways

The Ancona railway station is the main railway station of the city and is served by regional and long distance trains. The other stations are Ancona Marittima, Ancona Torrette, Ancona Stadio, Palombina and Varano. Nuovo Trasporto Viaggiatori plans to run services between Milan and Ancona starting in summer 2013.

Roads

The A14 motorway serves the city with the exits "Ancona Nord" (An. North) and "Ancona Sud" (An. South).

Urban public transportation

Ancona is served by an urban bus network operated by Conerobus, Bucci lines and Reni lines.

SOCIAL PROGRAM
Dinners with the Local Committee and visit to the city centre and surroundings.
MUST SEE

Ancona Cathedral

Ancona Cathedral, dedicated to Judas Cyriacus, was consecrated at the beginning of the 11th century and completed in 1189.[15] Some writers suppose that the original church was in the form of a basilica and belonged to the 7th century. An early restoration was completed in 1234. It is a fine Romanesque building in grey stone, built in the form of a Greek cross, and other elements of Byzantine art. It has a dodecagonal dome over the centre slightly altered by Margaritone d'Arezzo in 1270. The façade has a Gothic portal, ascribed to Giorgio da Como (1228), which was intended to have a lateral arch on each side.


 
A cannon situated near the Arch of Trajan, with the Cattedrale San Ciriaco visible in the background.

 
Gothic portal of the church of Sant'Agostino.

The interior, which has a crypt under each transept, in the main preserves its original character. It has ten columns which are attributed to the temple of Venus. The church was restored in the 1980s.

Other sights

  • The marble Arch of Trajan, 18 m high, erected in 114/115 as an entrance to the causeway atop the harbour wall in honour of the emperor who had made the harbour, is one of the finest Roman monuments in the Marche. Most of its original bronze enrichments have disappeared. It stands on a high podium approached by a wide flight of steps. The archway, only 3 m wide, is flanked by pairs of flutedCorinthian columns on pedestals. An attic bears inscriptions. The format is that of the Arch of Titus in Rome, but made taller, so that the bronze figures surmounting it, of Trajan, his wife Plotina and sister Marciana, would figure as a landmark for ships approaching Rome's greatest Adriatic port.
  • The Lazzaretto (Laemocomium or "Mole Vanvitelliana"), planned by architect Luigi Vanvitelli in 1732 is a pentagonal building covering more than 20,000 m², built to protect the military defensive authorities from the risk of contagious diseases eventually reaching the town with the ships. Later it was used also as a military hospital or as barracks; it is currently used for cultural exhibits.
  • The Episcopal Palace was the place where Pope Pius II died in 1464.
  • The church of Santa Maria della Piazza, with an elaborate arcaded façade (1210).
  • The Palazzo del Comune (or Palazzo degli Anziani - Elders palace), built in 1250, with lofty arched substructures at the back, was the work of Margaritone d'Arezzo, and has been restored twice.
  • Church of San Francesco alle Scale
  • Church of Sant'Agostino, built by the Augustinians in 1341 as Santa Maria del Popolo, and enlarged by Luigi Vanvitelli in the 18th century and turned into a palace after 1860. It has maintained the Gothic portal by Giorgio da Sebenico, with statues portraying St. Monica, St. Nicola da Tolentino, St. Simplicianus and Blessed Agostino Trionfi.
  • Church of the Santi Pellegrino e Teresa (18th century)
  • Church of the Santissimo Sacramento (16th and 18th centuries)

There are also several fine late Gothic buildings, including the Palazzo Benincasa, the Palazzo del Senato and the Loggia dei Mercanti, all by Giorgio da Sebenico, and the prefecture, which has Renaissance additions.

The National Archaeological Museum (Museo Archeologico Nazionale) is housed in the Palazzo Ferretti, built in the late Renaissance byPellegrino Tibaldi; it preserves frescoes by Federico Zuccari. The Museum is divided into several sections:

  • prehistoric section, with palaeolithic and neolithic artefacts, objects of the Copper Age and of the Bronze Age
  • protohistoric section, with the richest existing collection of the Picenian civilization; the section includes a remarkable collection of Greek ceramics
  • Greek-Hellenistic section, with coins, inscriptions, glassware and other objects from the necropolis of Ancona
  • Roman section, with a statue of Augustus, Pontifex Maximus, carved sarcophagi and two Roman beds with fine decorations in ivory
  • rich collection of ancient coins (not yet exposed)

 
The port of Ancona

The Municipal Art Gallery (Pinacoteca Civica) "Francesco Podesti" is housed in the Palazzo Bosdari, reconstructed in 1558 - 1561 byPellegrino Tibaldi. Works in the gallery include:

Other artists present include Ciro Ferri and Arcangelo di Cola (flourished 1416-1429). Modern artists featured are Bartolini, Bucci, Campigli, Bruno Cassinari, Cucchi, Levi, Sassu, Orfeo Tamburi, Trubbiani, Francesco Podesti and others.

Angelo Messi, ancestor of famous football star Lionel Messi, emigrated from Ancona to Rosario, Argentina in the 1880s.

Ancona is also the city of birth of Italian opera singer, Franco Corelli, and worldwide famous actress, Virna Lisi.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
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